Currently viewing the tag: "Isiah Thomas"

Last night, ESPN aired another installment of their award winning “30 for 30″ documentary series.  This episode was especially of interest to me (and likely most of you) because it was 2 hours of interviews, video, and discussion about the Detroit Pistons during the “Bad Boy era” of the late 80s and early 90s.  The 2 hours started with a brief explanation of the city of Detroit falling on hard times and its residents moving out to the suburbs, including the Pistons franchise.  It continued with a brief mention of how the front office was put together after several lackluster seasons (and even a still photo of Dick Vitale as Pistons head coach!).  The story continued on through the back to back championships and then ended by closing on how a majority of the team ended their careers.

It reminded me of what that team meant to me…(Full disclosure: I was 9 years old when the Pistons beat the Lakers)

I didn’t know what basketball was when Isiah Thomas was drafted #2 overall from Indiana University.  I didn’t know who Joe Dumars was, or for that matter, where McNeese was or what a state even was.

My Dad was born in mid-western Ohio, in an area where you were either a Cincinnati or Detroit fan.  My Grandfather was a big time Lions and Tigers fan, and eventually became a big time NCAA basketball fan.  I was born and raised about 8 miles west of Washington DC, and up until I would say 1987, I knew about basketball and a hoop, but I can’t admit to knowing there were professional leagues like baseball and football because my Dad is/was very much a fairweather fan when it came to basketball because he didn’t really grow up with basketball being a big thing.

My Dad was a guy who worked shift work at a local print shop, often working long hours helping make ends meet for my mom and I (which would eventually be 1 of the reasons they split up, because of all the hours he worked).  My Mom and Dad split up when I was 7 years old, and while I do remember that happening I don’t remember why.  What I do remember from this time period though early on in my life is that my Dad was always home and he had 2 friends from his job (a Laker and Celtics fan) that always came over, or we went to their house, to watch all of the pivotal games…together.

It’s my first memory of bonding with my Dad over something after my parents separated, because we spent a lot of time reading about and following the Pistons.  (I mean christ… I’m 11 years old and reading “The Franchise” about the Pistons and not even knowing what a cuss word is and the book is full of them.)  All of my pictures from school during those years you’d see me wearing a Pistons shirt or sweatpants or a combination of both.  We would go to Richard or Al Jackson’s (we always say Al Jackson’s full name, because, well… he’s Al Jackson) house whenever the Pistons would play the Celtics or Lakers, and we’d go to the Capital Center to see the Pistons when they came to Landover, Maryland to play the Washington Bullets.  His company had courtside seats, and I’ve stood next to John Salley and James Edwards as a 10 year old getting pictures taken when they came to town.

Looking back at clips and highlights of the Bad Boys teams, I love their physical and “blue collar” attitude toward the game.  I remember the highlights of the games as memories of watching them live.  Occasionally you’ll catch a replay of a Bad Boys era game on NBATV, but nowadays you really can only remember the games through the various highlight reel plays that ESPN wants to flash at you.

I love how GM Jack McCloskey wasn’t satisfied with merely reaching the playoffs or a certain level of the playoffs, even for a franchise that had not seen regular season success prior to his takeover of the front office, he was constantly wanting to improve the team.  Let’s not fool ourselves… the Pistons teams had a lot of talent on them.  Isiah Thomas was a #2 overall pick, Mark Aguirre was a #1 pick, Vinnie Johnson was a #7 pick, Adrian Dantley was a 2-time leading scorer in the NBA with 30+ points per night, etc etc etc… the team was put together a lot like that 2004 Pistons team was.  A core of once highly regarded players who came together and played for the betterment of each other as a group and not as individuals.  So often, this frustrated me about how Joe Dumars approached managing the personnel for the “Going to Work” Pistons teams.  Dumars seemed satisfied letting a player’s contract expire rather than using that player and his diminishing skill as an asset, and trading him for younger talent that could extend the Pistons latest run.  But… this isn’t a post meant to bash Dumars and his personnel decisions

Most importantly though for me personally… the Bad Boys spanned a critical transition period in my life (and including my Dad, our lives) where sports came along and eased the pain of a major life change like separation or divorce, by having a favorite team win or be on the verge of winning.  Finding out later about a lot of the details of what went on during those years, and more specifically the death of Joe Dumars’ father in the Portland Trailblazers series, have only cemented my love for the team

The Bad Boys turned me on to the game of basketball, and while my love for it has dissipated over the years (due to strikes, lockouts, etc), whenever I get together with my Dad for a beer or even when I see my Mom and the topic comes up, it’s a fun discussion to have and many laughs are shared.  My Mom always used to say “Danny, you should’ve been born on a basketball court in Detroit”, and while it never really made much sense to me, I guess the countless nights of me straggling back home as the street lights came on, from the park playing pickup basketball is the reason why she said that.  Afternoons of cherry picking at the 3 point line, trying to replicate Joe Dumars’ shooting motion (but as a lefty).

At the end of the 30 for 30 episode as the players were walking off the set with the caption of how they were either traded or retired, I couldn’t help but get emotional about it.  Hell… when Rick Mahorn got choked up talking about how he was picked by the Minnesota Timberwolves in the Expansion Draft after the 1989 championship season, it caused me to choke up a little bit.  All good things come to an end, and shortly after that period in the Pistons’ history, we had to endure years of the “Teal era” that vaulted the franchise deep into another dark period before the 2000s came along.  Let’s hope the Pistons can rebound again soon, so that the next generation of young, impressionable Detroit/NBA fans have a reason to cheer for the Pistons and make The Palace one of the loudest arenas in the NBA once again.

It was a very special night at the Palace of Auburn Hills Friday. The Bad Boys were reunited and honored at the halftime of the #Pistons vs. Heat game to commemorate the 25 year anniversary of their championship.

I’ve been to some very special nights at the Palace, so it was nice to have that special feeling in that building again.



Video Courtesy of Fox Sports Detroit

Dennis Rodman didn’t make it, but when you get to even say Fennis Dembo, let alone see him in person it’s like your birthday and Christmas rolled up in one.

The 23-36 #Pistons will host the 21-39 New York Knicks Monday night at the Palace of Aubrun Hills. The Knicks come into the Palace losers of their last six games, while Detroit have lost their last four.

The good: The Knicks are playing just about as bad as the Pistons are of late, so this is a great chance for Detroit to get back on track.
The bad: It doesn’t take a genius to realize that the Pistons are horrible on the defensive end but when you read the statistics it makes you feel even worse. They are ranked among the league’s worst, allowing 103.7 points per game, it’s been getting worse in the past few games. Their last seven opponents have averaged 112.3 points while shooting 49.6 percent. Turrrrrrable
Isiah Thomas FurThe unknown: If there is any truth to the rumor that Isiah Thomas is in line to take Joe Dumars GM spot, than Tom Gores is a total nut. If Thomas is ever a part of this team, get ready to be a fan of the Toronto Raptors.

Pistons: Chauncey Billups (left knee surgery) is out.
Knicks: Andrea Bargnani and Kenyon Martin are out.

Stat: Detroit is 1-1 against the New York Knicks this season.
Stat: Carmelo Anthony is averaging 29.5 points against the Pistons this season.

Tip off is at 7:30 pm and will be broadcast on Fox Sports Detroit . If you can’t catch the game on TV, catch it on the radio over at 97.1 The Ticket.

Josh Smith has a heck of a night on Friday against the 76ers, but he was the hero of the Palace when he scored the winning layup with 1.2 seconds left on the clock to give the Pistons the win against the Suns 110-108.

Key Points:

  • It was a frustrating night at the Palace for Pistons fans who watched Detroit lose an 18 point second half lead that gave way to the Suns knocking down open threes late in the fourth quarter. What’s even worse is Detroit led by three points 108-105 with 26 seconds on the clock on a Josh Smith three pointer only to have the Suns tie it up when Smith fouled Gerald Green on the other end to send him on to for three foul shots that he made to tie it with 4.3 on the clock.

smithJosh Smith: ”The last time I had the opportunity in New York, I settled for a jump shot [missing it in the closing seconds of an 89-85 loss to the Knicks. I wanted to be aggressive. I learned from that play that I made. I wanted to put the onus on the officials and I was able to get a good look at it." Via NBA.com

  • Smith finished with 25 on 11-of-16 shooting with 11 boards, five assist and a blocked shot.
  • Sheed, who did the post game interview at the Palace, reiterated that Josh said in the huddle as they were mapping out the last play the he wanted to make basically make up for his miss in New York. It wasn't more than 15 minutes after the buzzer has ended and Sheed was in his Pistons sweats and his Air Force One's.
  • Brandon Jennings had a heck of a night. Jennings tied Isiah Thomas' franchise record with 16 assists in the first half of the game. Jennings finished the game with 18 assists, a career high, adding eight points and eight boards.
Brandon Jennings Career Assists 18

Photo Getty Images – Editing Need4Sheed.com

  • Smith, Drummond and Monroe with double-doubles.
  • Greg Monroe scored 20 points with 12 boards, four assists and a steal.
  • Andre Drummond 13 points, 13 boards and five blocked shots. Dre looks like he’s making a point of blocking every shot that comes his way.
  • This dunk from what was clearly the most exciting assist on the night from Jennings, brought the house down.


  • Was wondering why Cheeks didn’t have either Monroe or Drummond in the game when it counted to grab boards? I know the Suns had a small lineup out there, but Detroit couldn’t get a board to save their life in when the big fella’s weren’t out there.
  • The Suns tried the Hack-A-Dre.  When they sent Andre to the line and he made the first one, he glared at Phoenix’s bench. No words were needed to know what Andre was saying, it’s just too bad he didn’t make them both.
  • Can’t let Barbosa, who the Suns just signed on the 10 day contract, get wide open threes late in the game.
  • Highlights via NBA.com


  • Will Bynum with 16 points on 6-of-11 shooting with one assist in 23 minutes. Bless Will, but he’s got to pass first instead of try to do everything himself when he’s out there.
  • Singler with cringe-worthy 6 turnovers, most of them coming as the Suns where edging their way back. Singler finished with six points on 3-of-9 shooting, adding eight boards.
  • It’s clear Rodney Stuckey isn’t back to true form yet. He finished with eight points in 20 minutes.
  • It’s funny how many people who go to Pistons games have no idea what’s going on. The girl behind me asked the guy she was with why Tayshaun Prince wasn’t playing.
  • The three-point line needs help, both offensively and defensively. The Suns were 13-35 from downtown, while Detroit was just 3-of-17 for a lowly 17.6%.
  • An extended break for Detroit, who don’t play again until Friday at the Palace against the Jazz.

To say it’s been a rough few years for the Detroit Pistons is an understatement.  We have watched them go from perennial Eastern Conference powerhouse and NBA Champions to the butt of jokes in town that could barely get people in the seats at the Palace. And you know what…it hasn’t been easy to watch.

Isiah ThomasAs a fan of this basketball team since Isiah was drafted, I can say it’s taken a toll on me personally.  I learned the NBA game watching the Detroit Pistons. I was just youngster when this team was starting to make their mark in the NBA when Boston and the Lakers dominated the league. I watched with shared heartache as when they came so close but let it slip away.  And when they finally broke through and won their first championship I reveled in the joy of  it all.

The road took this team on an incredible journey that very few franchises get to experience. The driver behind the trip was a great man named Bill Davidson that left his mark on the sports world by taking team ownership in sports to another level and built the foundation to the way they things are run today.  He trusted the right people, let them do their jobs and gave them the leeway to build winning teams.  And for that we will all remember him for what he did. His legacy will be one not forgotten, but it’s what happened after him that most of us would like to forget.

I am a fan of this team first and foremost.  Personnel, players and coaches change, but the Detroit Pistons will always be where the love is.  I never meant to invest a good part of my time and my life to this team, it just happened.  I’ve spent more money on tickets than I care to remember on and even more time watching, writing and losing sleep over the years.  And I wouldn’t trade if for the world.  Except a few blunders in the playoffs, an inbound pass that was picked off and a very memorable incident leaving of a certain 3-point shooter open.

Despite all the bad in past seven or so seasons, I’ve never wavered.  It hurt, but I kept on watching, reading and investing my time just like I had been for years. It was even more difficult for me as people around me (knowing that I do this little Need4Sheed thing) mocked the team, laughed at me and told me to run for the hills until better days and better games.

Detroit Pistons All Stars 2007

I didn’t.

The one thing I did do however is spoke the truth about what was going on with Detroit Basketball.  I love this team, but I’m not homer when it comes to putting blinders on when things go wrong.  I’m not an employee of the franchise and I don’t have to tow the company line. Things were awful.

Joe Dumars kept the band together while teams around him in the division got stronger.  When he finally made a move he essentially traded away the heart and soul for an aging superstar that would relieve the cap while causing issues the entire season on and off the court.  He brought in coaches that didn’t work, made horrible free agent signings, questionable and draft picks.  He even has player mutiny during his tenure.  I mean, did you ever think that the Rip Hamilton situation would end that way?  You can’t blame it all on Dumars as he tried to do what he could while the team was up for sale, but he could have done better.

It was one revolting development after another.  Just when you thought things would get better, they didn’t.  I love the team, but I never defended what was going on.

Are the tides changing for the better? It  sure looks that way.  The summer has brought big changes to this team, some that I’m excited about, some that I’m not.  Will they make a difference, I think so. New coach, new players, new enthusiasm means something to a franchise that is starving for the glory of season past. There hasn’t been this much talent on this team in a long time.

So this Pistons fan fells good today.  This is the first year in quite some time that I am overly excited to head off to the Palace on Wednesday night and watch my team open the 2013-2014 season. I am hoping for a year in which I won’t be mocked for still being a fan.  A year that It won’t be so easy to get tickets to the Palace on a night other than a Heat game.  A year that I will be happy standing in long lines to get popcorn.  A year that I will be happy writing recaps of games and putting a W by the schedule.  A year of promise.

Greg Monroe and Andre Drummond

This is my team.

I’m still here.

Download the Detroit #Pistons March 2013 Schedule Wallpaper featuring Detroit Bad Boy Joe Dumars.
Joe Dumars Detroit Pistons March 2013 Schedule Wallpaper

Download the Wallpapers here and throughout the month of March by clicking on the schedule wallpaper image displayed on the right sidebar of the page.

1024×768 | 1280×800 | 1366×768 | 1680×1050 |

1024×1024 (iPad)

Home games represented in red and road games in blue.

Follow Detroit Pistons on Twitter@Need4Sheed_com Follow me on twitter and suggest who should be on the April schedule.

So we’ve got some down time between now and the end of Summer when it comes to Pistons basketball.  What better to do than discuss who would be on your 12 man roster of All Time Detroit Pistons.  Some of the readers here are only old enough to know the young(er) guys like Rodney Stuckey, Tayshaun Prince, or Grant Hill, while some of the old(er) readers remember Dave Bing, Bob Lanier and even Dave DeBusschere.

Let’s set some ground rules:

  1. 2 point guards, 2 shooting guards, 1 combo guard/forward, 2 small forwards, and 5 power forward/center types.  Although the Miami Heat showed they can win without a true big man, there are enough good Pistons big men from the past that could get the job done.
  2. Pick a Coach, and coaching staff.  Your coaching staff can be a complete staff from a particular coach, if you’re not aware of the individuals who have coached over the years.
  3. Pick a uniform era (Teal era, Bad Boys blue and white, old blue and white with thunderbolt, etc)
  4. Pick an arena (likely all will pick The Palace, since The Silverdome was awful)

Ok, with all of that said, here is my team and an explanation as to why for each:

  1. Isiah Thomas (Starting PG): Hall of Famer.  Fiery leader who left it all out on the floor each night.
  2. Chauncey Billups (PG): Quiet leader who let his game do the talking.  Value was truly unknown to this team until his was traded.
  3. Joe Dumars (Starting SG): More of a combo guard than anything, because of his ball handling skills.  There is not a better guard tandem to have ever played this game than the backcourt of Thomas and Dumars.  Plus, he was my favorite player growing up.
  4. Vinnie Johnson (SG): Instant offense off the bench – may not be more talented than Richard Hamilton, but if I need a guy off the bench I want the Microwave.  (Note: my omission of Rip Hamilton is not meant to be a slight against him)
  5. Dave Bing (Combo SG/PG): Hall of Famer.  Bing was a player who was way ahead of his time.  Averaged 22 points a night in an era where the 3 point shot wasn’t available.
  6. Adrian Dantley (Starting SF): A lot of people will say that Mark Aguirre put the team over the top, because Dantley was only good at one end of the floor (offense).  Dantley made his impression on me as a youth with his scoring ability and high socks which made it look like he was faster than he actually is.
  7. Tayshaun Prince (SF): “The Block” is what should put him on every All Time Pistons team for the rest of his life.  That block was what helped propel the Pistons into the 2004 Finals for their franchise’s 3rd NBA Title.
  8. Dennis Rodman (Starting PF): “The Worm” is there to get under your skin.  A lock down defender against guys twice his size and weight.  Awful on offense, but with all the shots being hoisted up by my backcourt, I need solid rebounding down low.
  9. Ben Wallace (Starting C): Having Big Ben start alongside Rodman leaves me short up front, but who scores on these guys when both are in their prime?  This front court could average 24 rebounds a night.
  10. Bob Lanier (Backup PF/C): Averaged 23 and 12 a night for the majority of his career.  Left handed big men always get bonus points with me.
  11. Rasheed Wallace (Backup PF/C): Is the best stretch Power Forward from an era when the stretch power forward became a fad.  Known for his constant trash talking, Rasheed has been called the best teammate that his teammates ever had.
  12. Rick Mahorn (PF/C – 12th man/head benchmob cheerleader): Mahorn was a load in the paint.  Would smile in your face if he knew you didn’t like it.
  13. Chuck Daly (Head Coach): The implementer of the “Jordan Rules” would relish the chance to design defenses to guard some of today’s young “me first” basketball players.
  14. 1989-1990 Coaching Staff: Lead by future Toronto Head Coach Brendan Malone.
  15. The Palace of Auburn Hills (Arena): The Palace still looks new to me.  In an era where things have to be “bigger and better”, the Palace has been able to thrive for over 20 years now.  Sure, there have been several facelifts and modifications.  But like with fine wine, the Palace seems to get better with age.
  16. Bad Boys era blue and white Pistons uniforms:  Something about these unis signified toughness for me.  If it wasn’t the plain block lettering with the big red and white stripes, it was the plain blue shorts with the stripes around your waist and down your thighs (like boxing trunks).  Plain and simple, until they were screwed up by the teal era.

Detroit Bad Boys

Honorable mention: Grant Hill, Bill Laimbeer, Richard Hamilton, James Edwards, and John Salley.  Larry Brown and Flip Saunders.

I couldn’t nominate Grant Hill to be a starter, because although he was one of the best players to ever wear the Pistons red blue and white, he wanted to get out of Detroit.  He wanted to escape the teal era.  I couldn’t do Rip either – too many guys who were the epitome of Pistons basketball for me growing up as a child of the late 80s and early 90s.  These are guys who I emulated on the basketball court myself.  Buddha and Salley were tough casualties, but I could only keep 12.  Same with Laimbeer.

So let’s hear it Pistons fans, who is your All Time team?  I can admit I wasn’t around to see Bob Lanier or Dave Bing play, but their stats don’t lie.  It would be fun watching the combination of Ben and Rasheed Wallace match up against the big men from the Bad Boys era, like Laimbeer and Salley had to.

 

By Rashid S. Umar

It’s common knowledge, at least on this site, that I’ve been a fan of the Detroit Pistons since I as seven years old, dating back to the 1983-84 season.

Over the years, I’ve found myself becoming more and more emotionally involved with the team, as well as, all of the others who represent Motor City, and I’ve noticed some things.

Detroit Bad Boys
As a teen, I used to watch each game with a grey and blue Pistons t-shirt in my lap, I would wake up to my Isiah Thomas autographed basketball and said wished it “good morning” (if you laugh I will hunt you down and eat your soul, this is hard for me as is), heck even during the 2004-2005 seasons, when the team would be on the verge of losing a series I would wear my red, white, and blue shirt, in hopes that they would stave off elimination – it actually worked until the game seven loss in the ’05 Finals to the Spurs.

Now has come a new wrinkle in my “fanatic” lifestyle, I find myself deleting players from my social media i.e. Facebook friends once they leave.

Ohhhhh… serious… I know.

It started with Grant Hill back in 2000.  I was a fan of his website and would receive e-mail updates of his newsletter.  Once he left for Orlando, I deactivated my account with the enclosed message “Burn in Hell, Grant!!”  Harsh?  Yeah, I know.

Years later, once Ben Wallace decided to leave for Chicago in 2006, Rasheed leaving for Boston in 2009, and Rip Hamilton this past off-season, I deleted them all from my Facebook account in an attempt to mask the disappointment of them moving on with their careers.
One of my good friends said, “I understand what you’re saying, but I keep them as ‘friends’ because I still root for them.”

I respect your thoughts, sir.

Now, I know that this is a business, and I know that we as die-hard fans tend to go overboard, but don’t try to talk sense into us at the time of these events happening.

I guess, in a way, at least for me, when someone decides to leave it’s like they’re dissin’ our much maligned city.

Or, perhaps it’s just a case of a die-hard fan being a fan.

What crazy thing do you as a fan sometimes?

Rashid Umar is a guest writer for Need4Sheed.com.  He can be contacted via Facebook or email at inquires@rashidumar.com, or visit his website at http://www.rashidumar.com.

By Rashid S. Umar

Transition in sports can be tough.  After years of being amongst the elite, old age and a stale mix of players can lead to a mediocre product, which is later dismantled in an attempt to rebuild.  This is something that Detroit Pistons’ fans have seen before.

At the end of the famed “Bad Boys” era, the Pistons found themselves looking up at the rest of the Eastern Conference falling to the depths of the 60-loss club in 1994.

Detroit Bad Boys

Before that season, management had decided to trade a disgruntled Dennis Rodman to San Antonio for fan favorite Sean Elliot.  The move was looked at as a positive one considering that Elliot was young and athletic.  However, with an aging Isiah Thomas and Bill Laimbeer – both would make that season their last – rookies Lindsay Hunter and Allan Houston, mainstay Joe Dumars and Terry Mills, and others, the team would finish 20-62.  It is still the franchise’s second worst record ever – the worst was 16-66 in 1980 — and fortunately, no team has challenged it since…possibly until 2012.

This year’s edition of the “Motown Sound” offers a collection of young talent, mixed matched players, a new coaching staff, and a new owner.  The only issue is – other than the 4-14 start after being beaten like a drum in OKC – is the fact that the roster is comprised with guys who not only lack offensive ability, but also a lack of defensive and rebounding awareness… among other things.

After finally finding a new owner, firing a overmatch and under qualified coach after two awful seasons, and buying out a team legend who’d become more of whiner than a winner; the team has for lack of a better phrase regressed… more.

The team currently is 30th in the league in scoring at 84.9 a game, only Detroit Pistons the Teal Yearsthree more than the all-time low of 81.9 by the 1999 Chicago Bulls.  They are 27th in the league in point differential at -10 a game and are second to last in opponent’s field goal percentage at .477.

The ’94 team was second to last in scoring, and point differential.

The team’s lone bright spots are their cornerstones of the future in Greg Monroe and Brandon Knight.  As for the others, Rodney Stuckey and Ben Gordon remain enigmas, Charlie V. hasn’t contributed much due to injuries, Tayshaun Prince’s resigning remains a mystery, Ben Wallace is too old to bring it every night, and Austin Daye seems lost.  The others… well… Jason Maxiell and Jonas Jerebko are bigs who struggle to make an impact, and Will Bynum shoots too much.

Add the fact that coach Lawrence Frank is trying to implement a new system that requires effort and accountability on both ends of the court – something that was lost during the John Kuester era – and you have a roster that is easily exploitable.

Not to be lost here is the fact that the lockout had only hindered the opportunity for teams like Detroit to work through some of its perceived issues.  Teams like the Heat, Bulls, and Thunder have a more stable setting with players who have played together and rely on defense and rebounding to win games.

Now I must admit that as a diehard fan, I can’t turn away.  In addition to the ’94 Pistons’ season, I have the 2009 Detroit Lions season (0-16) and 2003 Detroit Tigers (43-119) to claim as a product of my emotional investment.

As a longtime Pistons’ fan – and I’ve been one since 1984 – I have had some great times and some not-so great times rooting for this team.  I must admit that I didn’t think we would ever be subjected to another year like ’94.   However, every team at some point – even the Lakers: 1994 and 2005 – and it’s just our turn.   But, who expected it to be this bad?

There is however hope.

After another trip to the lottery this summer, the Pistons should be able to grab an impact player in a draft that is being billed as the best since 2003, when the likes of: Dwyane Wade, Lebron James, Chris Bosh – all are currently on the same team interestingly enough – and… Darko…

But still, did we think it would be this bad?

Rashid Umar is a guest writer for Need4Sheed.com.  He can be contacted via Facebook email at inquires@rashidumar.com, or visit his website at http://www.rashidumar.com.

It was an emotional night at the Palace with a bulk of the Bad Boys on hand the Pistons honored Dennis Rodman by retiring his jersey and hanging it in the rafters of the Palace.

If you didn’t have the honor of following Dennis’s career you probably don’t realize what kind of person he really is.  The hair, tattoos and the stunts don’t even scratch the surface of the emotion, heart and will that Dennis had. Rodman left his mark on this franchise and not only will his jersey hang in the rafters of the Palace forever, the’s going to deservedly be inducted into the Basketball Hall of fame this year.

The Palace was electric and trust me when I tell you there wasn’t a dry eye (including my own) in the house when Dennis held up the t-shirt with a picture of Chuck Daly and Mr. Davidson that said Thank You Detroit on the back.

Photo/Getty Images editing Need4Sheed.com

Get the Flash Player to see this content.

Video courtesy of the NBA and the Detroit Pistons

Be patient, this is a long video (about 30 min) and it may take a while to load.

Class act Dennis, no matter what you think you deserve all of this. We thank you!