Currently viewing the tag: "Caldwell-Pope"

You may not have been stoke about Dumars passing on Trey Burke, but don’t count out Kentavious, an athletic wing that can knock down shots, something Detroit sorely need.

Complimenting his first round pick Dumars went with Tony Mitchell of North Texas State with the 37th pick. At 6-foot-8¾ and 236 pounds with a 38-inch vertical leap Mitchell was viewed as a lottery pick when the college season started, but he had a sophomore season that set him back.

“From a talent standpoint, this is somebody who could very well be the best athlete in the entire draft,” Pistons assistant general manager George David said. Via Pistons.com

Louisville vs South Florida by by Tim GirtonThe Pistons finished the night by drafting Peyton Siva a point guard of Louisville’s NCAA championship team, with the 56th pick. Siva, a three-year starter, averaged 10 points, 5.7 assists and 2.2 steals a game for the Cardinals in 2012-13.

This pick may say two things, Detroit is hell bent on making Brandon Knight their point guard and their probably not going to re-sign Jose Calderon.

You’ll get to see both of them soon during the Pistons Summer league play in Orlando that starts on July 7th. Siva will play point guard, Caldwell-Pope likely will be the shooting guard, though the Pistons expect second-year player Kim English to be in Orlando, as well. Khris Middleton will be the small forward with Mitchell at power forward and Andre Drummond at center.

Say what you will about the Joe’s picks this year, but he had ‘stones passing up Burke, and finishing the draft the way he did.  He knows his job is on the line so maybe he’s got more up his sleeve.

I’m sure you’re just like me and you’re shocked that Detroit Passed on Trey Burke and picked Kentavious Caldwell-Pope who wasn’t even a dot on most Pistons fans radar.

At this point, what is Joe Dumars thinking?

More to come ….

From Draft Express

Caldwell-Pope posted fairly high usage numbers, as his 17.6 possessions per-game ranks fifth in this group (third among high-major conference SGs), and is a reflection of just how heavily Georgia relied on his ability to put the ball in the basket last season.

His play-type usage doesn’t really stand out from the crowd, as he did a little bit of everything last season, but his 5.1 combined pick and roll and isolation possessions per-game does set him apart from McLemore and Oladipo, as he used more than twice as many possessions creating his own shot in the half court than any guard projected to be selected in the first round.

Caldwell-Pope’s biggest weapon when he looked to score was his pull-up jump shot. With nearly three-quarters of his shot attempts coming from the perimeter in the half court, roughly half of which were off the bounce, he scored a second ranked 1.118 points per-shot as a pull-up jump shooter, an impressive mark relative to his average 1.066 points per-shot in catch and shoot situations.

If Caldwell-Pope has a weakness on paper, it is his average finishing ability relative to his peer group. A 55.6% shooter in transition and 53.7% shooter at the rim in half court situations, he hovers right around the mean in both categories. Turning the ball over on a sample second ranked 10.6% of his possessions, Caldwell-Pope’s low turnover rate certainly helped compensate for his issues around the rim last season.